Quilt Mini-Split Cool and Heat Your Home with Stunning Design Inside and Out

Aiming to transform the heating and cooling industry with sleek, smart designs, Quilt was founded by former Google employees. The company raised $9 million in a seed round in May 2023, led by Lowercarbon Capital and Gradient Ventures, positioning itself to scale operations and bring innovative products to market. Inspired by design principles from Apple, Tesla, and Nest, Quilt targets consumers seeking both aesthetics and functionality in their home HVAC systems.

Designer: Quilt

The indoor units are compact in size and feature customizable front panels. Unlike the bulky designs found in traditional mini-splits, Quilt offers options such as oak wood veneer or surfaces that can be painted or wallpapered to match any interior decor. This flexibility allows the units to either blend seamlessly with or enhance home aesthetics. Moreover, the inclusion of color-customizable accent lighting adds a personal touch, serving as a nightlight or mood light.

The exterior unit, often a significant drawback for potential buyers due to its unattractive appearance, has been reimagined with a sleek, unobtrusive design. Quilt’s outdoor unit is compact and aesthetically pleasing, ensuring it doesn’t detract from a home’s exterior.

These heat pumps are packed with smart features designed to optimize comfort and efficiency. The Dial, a central control device, combines a touchscreen with a rotary control, providing an intuitive user interface. Compatible with Thread and Matter smart home communication protocols, the Dial ensures seamless integration with other smart devices. The Sense module, featuring a millimeter-wave occupancy sensor, accurately detects room occupancy, optimizing energy use and maintaining comfort levels.

The system’s zoning capability allows for precise temperature control in individual rooms, maximizing energy efficiency. With the ability to maintain 90% of its heating capacity down to -13 degrees F and utilizing R-32 refrigerant, which has a lower global warming potential than R-410a, Quilt’s heat pumps are both powerful and environmentally friendly.

The design and functionality make it ideal for various use cases, especially in regions with older buildings where central air installation is impractical. For instance, in Europe and Asia, where many buildings lack central air conditioning, Quilt’s ductless mini-splits offer an efficient, aesthetically pleasing solution. In the U.S., homeowners with rooms that are difficult to heat or cool, such as an upstairs office above a garage, can benefit from Quilt’s smart and attractive units. The customizable design and efficient performance make Quilt an appealing option for those who have avoided traditional mini-splits due to their unattractive exterior units.

Quilt’s customizable front panel blend in with your decor unlike other white mini-split.

Quilt distinguishes itself from competitors like Mitsubishi, Daikin, and Carrier with its focus on design and smart features. While traditional units may offer similar functionality, Quilt’s emphasis on aesthetics and user experience sets it apart. The customizable front panels and sleek exterior unit provide a significant visual upgrade, appealing to consumers who value both form and function. Additionally, Quilt’s smart technology, including the intuitive Dial and advanced occupancy sensing, enhances the user experience, making it a more attractive option for tech-savvy homeowners.

The ability to integrate seamlessly into smart home ecosystems and a commitment to sustainability with the use of R-32 refrigerant further bolster its competitive edge. With the global heat pump market expected to grow significantly, Quilt is well-positioned to capture a share of this expanding market by offering a product that combines beauty, intelligence, and efficiency.

Innovative design and smart features redefine the residential HVAC market by addressing both aesthetic and functional concerns. With a strong foundation and backing from notable investors, Quilt is poised to lead the next wave of HVAC innovation, providing consumers with a product that is as beautiful as it is efficient.

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Mercedes-Benz supercar concept is the first automobile to have a music instrument built into its exterior

Mercedes-Benz as an automotive icon has set the tone for the 21st century with supercars like AMG GT and the CLA concept. The German marque has pushed the limits of automotive technology, design aesthetics and luxurious comfort for purists who desire nothing but the best with the least strings attached.

Lately, we had a fancy for wild concepts like the Dresscode which is inspired by the smooth silhouettes of a classy suit and now we’ve tripped over another Mercedes-Benz supercar concept that derives inspiration from the beauty of silent luxury. This core idea is combined with the shapes of musical instruments (a Harp to be precise) to create a concept that harmonizes the pure and geometric form. Thus the namesake, Mercedes-Benz Harp!

Designer: ByeongIn Oh

The front of the concept Mercedes car is inspired by the W196R Formula-1 racing car developed for the 1954 and 1955 seasons. Of course, the front grille is not that open and is streamlined along the front seam for a more modern aesthetic look. This is combined with the asymmetric windshield panel to the rear which has a polygon and pure sculpture shape. The contrast between the contoured front and the sharp rear gives the HARP a distinct persona. It’s just like a god-like figure draped in the most beautiful costume.

The way those strings are aligned with the rear explains the asymmetric shape of the rear which when viewed from the top looks like a Harp in motion. Even the rear lights are shaped like strings which I think should trickle down to a real car coming from Mercedes Benz. Moving on to the interiors, they have two contrasting sections – a silent compartment for people who seek solitude and an open compartment for people who want to socialize.

The Mercedes-Benz Harp concept is an interesting take on silent luxury, artist forms and the pleasure of driving. And yes, I almost forgot to mention the contrasting color hues of matte silver and glossy black!

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Meet The Twisted Brick Shell Library – A Surreal Pavilion For Visitors To Read In

Designed by architecture practice HCCH Studio, this shell-like brick pavilion in Longyou Country, China is truly a unique sight to behold. The structure is inspired by its agricultural surroundings and is dubbed the Twisted Brick Shell Library (quite accurately). The rustic pavilion is located on farmland, with the Quijiang River running between it and the city of Quzhou. The structure is designed to be a multifunctional space – a peaceful place where visitors can read, relax, or simply gaze at their surroundings.

Designer: HCCH Studio

“[It is] an abstract, revolving space to cuddle visitors in the wide-open field like a spiritual shelter,” said HCCH Studio founder Hao Chen. “The function is an installation to arouse visitors’ awareness of reading and its surroundings,” he added. Besides serving as a space to read and rest, the Twisted Brick Library is also designed to represent its surreal position between urban and rural settings. The Twisted Brick Library comprises two brick-hemispheres which are linked via a twisting section of wall. The wall is made from perforated steel plates, and concrete cast in situ. The concrete almost looks like mortar between the bricks, and resembles typical brick buildings seen in the town located closely to the pavilion.

“The structure is in a semi-rural area very close to a town,” said Chen. “You can strongly feel the approaching of urbanisation on this seemingly still idyllic area. That’s why we propose a semi-fabricated, semi-handmade way of construction, to reflect this reality,” he continued. The interior of the pavilion is lined with 24 small acrylic domes which have been integrated at eye level. Each dome features ‘visual poetry’ by Japanese artist Yoichiro Otani, and you’re supposed to read the work with the landscape as a lovely backdrop.

Slim, concrete-framed openings are placed beneath the dome, and they provide views of the landscape. Below the openings is a brick bench which offers seating. The Twisted Brick Shell Library not only functions as a multipurpose space for tourists and locals, but it also hosts reading workshops by artist Shaomin Shen.

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Bark-lined furniture among showcase of Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance's work in New York

Duchafour Lawrance bark furniture

French designer Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance has shown three collections highlighting European vernacular craft traditions at New York gallery Demisch Danant during NYCxDesign.

Duchaufour-Lawrance showed three collections under the Made In Situ collection at the downtown Manhattan gallery Demisch Danant.

Portugues panels
Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance has shown three collections from Made In Situ in New York

Ranging from furniture lined with bark to beeswax candles where the wax becomes part of the candle, the pieces derive from Duchaufour-Lawrance’s experience in small European communities and their ecosystems, as well as the unity between craftsmanship and natural processes.

The designer travelled to each place to act as an interpreter between different vernacular traditions and between the traditions and his audience.

Bark furniture
Furniture made with bark from the oak cork tree illustrated the designer’s focus on natural processes

“My approach has been reversed,” said Duchaufour-Lawrance.

“The idea no longer creates the piece of furniture or the object, it is the practice of the artisan and his knowledge of the material, which determines or imposes it.”

“By moving from one design to another, as a designer I became more like a translator,” he continued.

Bark furniture
Healthy and burnt wood was used for the collection of furniture

Visitors entering the glass-walled entrance to the gallery first saw a collection of graphic work dedicated to the Made In Situ collection, which has been an ongoing process over the past five years, including explorations in burnt cork furniture.

The first set of objects was Chêne & Liège, a collection of chairs, shelving and lamps that showcases the process of collecting oak cork in France.

According to the designer, the oak-cork bark is an important aspect in making forests fire-resistant, but must be removed for the health of the trees.

Here, material from the trunks of burnt trees was combined with healthy bark harvested with the help of local lumberjacks, harvesters and woodworkers to showcase the range of the material in nature.

“Together, the wood salvaged from the flames and the healthy bark create furniture of a paradoxical nature that is crafted with an awareness of social and environmental issues,” said the gallery.

The next collection included panels of azulejos – Portuguese tiles – painted and shaped by the artist with the help of craftspeople in Lisbon.

Each of the panels, which are backed by wood structures reminiscent of boats, represents different points on the coastline between Brittany and Portugal to interrogate “the meaning and materialization of memories and the connection to the mighty ocean,” according to the team.

An LED light installation with undulating blue shades was showcased on the wall to further the oceanic theme of this collection.

Candle on the wall of gallery
The designer showed candle holders informed by propellor-making techniques

Finally, an array of beeswax candle holders were presented in the back of the shop.

The holders were crafted in many different sizes and have forms based on the processes of smelting the designer experienced in a propeller factory in Peniche, Portugal.

Duchaufour-Lawrance then travelled across Portugal, working with beekeepers to collect different types of wax to fashion into darkly coloured candles.

The wax is meant to “solidify directly with the bronze” of the holders, and the gallery noted that one of the pieces has sold with the melted wax still intact.

The photography is by Lucas Creighton.

Made In Situ is on show at Demisch Danant from 16 May to 29 June. See the NYCxDesign 2024  guide on Dezeen Events Guide for information about the many other exhibitions, installations and talks taking place throughout the week.

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Core77 Weekly Roundup (5-13-24 to 5-17-24)

Here’s what we looked at this week:

A man was ordered by the city to build a visual screen to conceal his boat. He complied.

This incredible mobile bridge, designed and built in Switzerland, diverts traffic overhead during road repairs.

This TriqBriq production system turns otherwise unusable wood into Lego-like blocks for homebuilding.

Barebones’ Pivot Arc Lighter is an easy-to-carry folding lighter that extends reach.

This combination carabiner/rope tightener provides quick, convenient tie-down for smaller stuff.

An Alabama hairdresser invented what is now the best way to clean up oil spills: Use human hair.

An appealing transportation design concept: The Swift Pod autonomous sleeping mobile.

Strange, possibly effective? A battery-powered jacket-inflating personal cooling device.

Some were fooled by claims that Hasbro would unveil this G.I. Joe aircraft carrier bathtub at Comic-Con. (It’s AI-rendered.)

First developed in 1964, Snooper trucks are the specialty vehicles required for underbridge inspections. Their jobs are safe…for now.

Washington State’s Department of Transportation is pioneering the use of drones vs. high-up graffiti.

OpenAI posted some astonishing demos of their flagship AI, which can listen, speak, see, and more creepily emulate human tone.

Furniture with wood and stone joinery, by Maine-based designer Ethan Stebbins.

Richard Haining’s STACKED series of vessels are painstakingly made from wood offcuts, borrowing a ceramics technique.

This Wind bench, by Belgian designer Peter Donders, combines digital fabrication with hand craftsmanship.

Mechanical Engineering students at Johns Hopkins have invented a leaf blower silencer. Stanley Black & Decker will put it in production.

Outside-the-box thinking: Veteran tent designer Jake Lah’s Cot Tents.

Monocab: “Individual local public transport” pods that ride disused railway lines.

Industrial design case study: HS Design revamps Canfield Scientific’s Vectra portable imaging tool.

Team of Arkansas designers creates a ramped bikeable office building

Arkansas bike building

Arkansas has claimed its first bikeable structure – a ramped office building in Bentonville designed by Michel Rojkind, Callaghan Horiuchi and Marlon Blackwell Architects.

Completed at the end of 2022, the 230,000-square foot (21,368-square metre) mixed-use office is known as The Ledger.

A collaboration between Mexican architect Michel Rojkind and Arkansas-based studios Callaghan Horiuchi and Marlon Blackwell Architects, the building was “designed to be community-centric”.

Bikeable office building
The office was designed by Michel Rojkind, Callaghan Horiuchi and Marlon Blackwell Architects

The Ledger – with its ziggurat-like form and its blocky neighbouring parking garage – is one of the tallest structures in Bentonville and offers a diverse range of amenities for workers and locals.

While the city is most famously known for being the birthplace of Walmart, it has dubbed itself the “mountain biking capital of the world,” prompting the design team to integrate a 12-foot (3.5-metre) wide ramp into the side of each floor.

The Ledger in Arkansas
There is also a concrete parking garage

The paved concrete pathway ramps approximately 1,900 feet (580 metres) back and forth across the building’s eastern facade.

“Blurring the lines of where the building begins and the sidewalk ends, pedestrian ramps extend up into the air, a continuous zig-zag of movement up the eastside of the building along Main Street, inviting the public up onto a series of stepping terraces, scaling the building to the surrounding context, inviting moments of refuge and prospect,” the team said.

Bikeable office structure in Arkansas
Vertical glass wraps the bikeable building

The floor plates – composed almost entirely of open office space, empty save the structural steel columns for tenant finish out – shift north and south, forming a series of alternating covered terraces on the short ends of the rectangular levels.

In effect, the ramp and terraces create a vertical park that can be biked from the street to the uppermost outdoor balcony.

The sixth-floor terrace holds bike racks and features a wide central staircase that ascends to the open roof deck, where a thin copper-coloured screen conceals circulation and mechanical systems.

The levels are wrapped in bands of vertical glass plans, but the ramping floor plates are delineated by bands of patinated copper paneling.

Interior of The Ledger
The mixed-use office is known as The Ledger

“Tracing the lines of the ramp, copper cladding provides a warm tactility akin to the warm tones of the brick buildings around the historic square,” the team said.

Invisible from the street, a surprising detail emerges on the ramp. Ninety-five glass mosaics depicting insects are set into the concrete. The creations by Australian graphic artist Stefan Sagmeister crawl up the inclined path, toward an inscription on the sixth-floor terrace that reads “Now is better.”

Kinetic fish on the facade of the concrete parking garage
The concrete parking garage touts two large kinetic fish

The insects aren’t the only life forms memorialised in the structure. The concrete parking garage – screened on either end by multi-coloured copper windscreens – touts two large kinetic fish that glitter in the sunlight.

Also in Bentonville, Marlon Blackwell Architects designed a private school composed of a series of asymmetrical, angular buildings in bright reds and greens. Those colours also appear in the façade of the pediatric clinic the studio designed in nearby Rogers, Arkansas.

The photography is by Timothy Hursley.


Project credits:

Design architect: Michel Rojkind
Design architect and design manager: Callaghan Horiuchi
Design architect and architect of record: Marlon Blackwell Architects

The post Team of Arkansas designers creates a ramped bikeable office building appeared first on Dezeen.

Team of Arkansas designers creates a ramped bikeable office building

Arkansas bike building

Arkansas has claimed its first bikeable structure – a ramped office building in Bentonville designed by Michel Rojkind, Callaghan Horiuchi and Marlon Blackwell Architects.

Completed at the end of 2022, the 230,000-square foot (21,368-square metre) mixed-use office is known as The Ledger.

A collaboration between Mexican architect Michel Rojkind and Arkansas-based studios Callaghan Horiuchi and Marlon Blackwell Architects, the building was “designed to be community-centric”.

Bikeable office building
The office was designed by Michel Rojkind, Callaghan Horiuchi and Marlon Blackwell Architects

The Ledger – with its ziggurat-like form and its blocky neighbouring parking garage – is one of the tallest structures in Bentonville and offers a diverse range of amenities for workers and locals.

While the city is most famously known for being the birthplace of Walmart, it has dubbed itself the “mountain biking capital of the world,” prompting the design team to integrate a 12-foot (3.5-metre) wide ramp into the side of each floor.

The Ledger in Arkansas
There is also a concrete parking garage

The paved concrete pathway ramps approximately 1,900 feet (580 metres) back and forth across the building’s eastern facade.

“Blurring the lines of where the building begins and the sidewalk ends, pedestrian ramps extend up into the air, a continuous zig-zag of movement up the eastside of the building along Main Street, inviting the public up onto a series of stepping terraces, scaling the building to the surrounding context, inviting moments of refuge and prospect,” the team said.

Bikeable office structure in Arkansas
Vertical glass wraps the bikeable building

The floor plates – composed almost entirely of open office space, empty save the structural steel columns for tenant finish out – shift north and south, forming a series of alternating covered terraces on the short ends of the rectangular levels.

In effect, the ramp and terraces create a vertical park that can be biked from the street to the uppermost outdoor balcony.

The sixth-floor terrace holds bike racks and features a wide central staircase that ascends to the open roof deck, where a thin copper-coloured screen conceals circulation and mechanical systems.

The levels are wrapped in bands of vertical glass plans, but the ramping floor plates are delineated by bands of patinated copper paneling.

Interior of The Ledger
The mixed-use office is known as The Ledger

“Tracing the lines of the ramp, copper cladding provides a warm tactility akin to the warm tones of the brick buildings around the historic square,” the team said.

Invisible from the street, a surprising detail emerges on the ramp. Ninety-five glass mosaics depicting insects are set into the concrete. The creations by Australian graphic artist Stefan Sagmeister crawl up the inclined path, toward an inscription on the sixth-floor terrace that reads “Now is better.”

Kinetic fish on the facade of the concrete parking garage
The concrete parking garage touts two large kinetic fish

The insects aren’t the only life forms memorialised in the structure. The concrete parking garage – screened on either end by multi-coloured copper windscreens – touts two large kinetic fish that glitter in the sunlight.

Also in Bentonville, Marlon Blackwell Architects designed a private school composed of a series of asymmetrical, angular buildings in bright reds and greens. Those colours also appear in the façade of the pediatric clinic the studio designed in nearby Rogers, Arkansas.

The photography is by Timothy Hursley.


Project credits:

Design architect: Michel Rojkind
Design architect and design manager: Callaghan Horiuchi
Design architect and architect of record: Marlon Blackwell Architects

The post Team of Arkansas designers creates a ramped bikeable office building appeared first on Dezeen.

Ten design projects by students at the University of West England

Visualisation of a building with a suspended walkway above it

Dezeen School Shows: an architectural scheme that aims to reconnect and celebrate the historic areas of Rome is included in Dezeen’s latest school show by students at the University of West England.

Also included is a hub in Bristol geared towards supporting activists, and a publication that collates academic texts that examine and promote the value of low-resolution images.


University of West England (UWE)

Institution: University of West England
School: School of Arts, Technology and Enviroment
Course: BA (Hons) Interior Architecture, BA (Hons) Interior Design, BA (Hons) Graphic Design, MArch Architecture and BEng (Hons) Architecture and Environmental Engineering
Tutors: Dr Sophia Banou, Dr Tonia Carless, Joe Laybourn, Phil O’Shaughnessy, Natasha Smith, Colum Leith, Dr Fidel Meraz, Andrew Bourne, Dr Karl Hutchison and Chris Puttick

School statement:

“We’re thrilled to share this year’s work from our graduating students across the College of Arts, Technology and Environment.

“An annual highlight for the university and city of Bristol, we invite you to discover a new generation of talent.

“Our UWE Bristol degree show combines exhibitions at Bower Ashton, Arnolfini, Spike Island and Frenchay Campus, accompanied by an extensive digital showcase.

“Celebrate the exceptional work of more than 1,200 graduates from more than 40 courses.

“We are thrilled to share our students’ work publicly and give them the chance to demonstrate their ingenuity and creativity to a wider audience,” said Elena Marco, Pro-Vice Chancellor and Head of College of Arts, Technology and Environment. “This is a critical point in their careers, and they should be proud of everything they have achieved so far.”


Visualisation and technical drawing showing a structure beside a harbour

Rhizoscape: Unveiling the Subterranean Architecture of Connectivity by See Kar Kit

“‘Rhizoscape: Unveiling the Subterranean Architecture of Connectivity’ is an intriguing exploration of architecture that delves beneath the surface to reveal layers of connectivity and complexity.

“The concept aims to embrace rhizome-thinking by creating multi-connected pathways within the space of Arnolfini and the broader society of Bristol.

“By weaving these pathways through the building and the harborside, the project offers numerous perspectives of the exhibition or the harbour, fostering a philosophy of interconnectedness.

“This innovative approach enhances the experience of the exhibition and strengthens the bond between architecture and society, paving the way for a more interconnected and dynamic urban environment.”

Student: See Kar Kit
Course: BA (Hons) Interior Architecture
Tutors: Dr Sophia Banou, Dr Tonia Carless and Joe Laybourn


Visualisation showing the entryway of a distillery

Botanical inspired zero to low-alcohol distillery and bar by Sayoko Briggs

“This project is a botanical-inspired low to non-alcoholic bar and distillery.

“The design aims to re-define Bristol’s relationship with alcohol to combat the high rate of alcohol-related hospital admissions.

“The customer journey will include personalised spirit distilling workshops using botanicals grown on the rooftop garden, following an immersive bar experience and mocktail workshops using their personalised non-alcoholic spirit.

“The concept of the space focuses on promoting the importance of mutualism between humans and the natural environment, using forms within the space inspired by symbiotic relationships within nature.

“The image shows a visual of the main entrance.”

Student: Sayoko Briggs
Course: BA (Hons) Interior Design
Tutors: Phil O’Shaughnessy and Natasha Smith


Hand-drawn technical drawings and photographs of a model

The Mind Plants a Seed by Rohan Phang

“The Mind Plants a Seed represents a hybrid typology of a mental health centre, urban farm and food hall.

“These architectural spaces work in harmony to fulfil the principles of horticultural therapy.

“Users begin therapy with counselling and after graduating from counselling they engage in farming, through which their produce is celebrated.

“Plants thrive from the care and nurturing and the users undertaking the farming activities view plant growth as confirmation of their own success.

“The flow of movement and activities within the building establishes an endless metaphor for human growth and development through communicating a sense of orderliness and progression.”

Student: Rohan Phang
Course: BA (Hons) Interior Design
Tutor: Phil O’Shaughnessy and Natasha Smith


Cover and Cut by Mathilde Strømme

“This project proposes a publication that investigates the intricate interplay between an outdated economic indicator, the ‘hemline index’, and the UK’s current economic recession.

“This is a theory, established by George Taylor in 1926, that links hemline lengths to stock market performance, proposing that during time of economic upturn, skirts shorten signalling optimism, while in downturns, they lengthen as a sign of conservatism.

“Adopting a speculative perspective this project urges readers to embrace a longer, more modest hemline in correlation with today’s economic crisis.

“This publication includes perforated posters and digitally embroidered slogan patches that can be sewn onto garments.”

Student: Mathilde Strømme
Course: BA (Hons) Graphic Design
Tutor: Colum Leith


Visualisation of a white structure within a larger space

Food of the Gods by Kayla Haughton

“Food of the Gods is a chocolate-tasting experience.

“Made up of individual ‘pods’ that represent the internal membrane structure of the cacao fruit, each room is designed to reflect a different flavour profile of chocolate, to enhance and heighten your experience of this beloved food and take you on a journey.

“The project references Aztec and Mayan cultures who worshipped chocolate, valuing it more important than gold, and even sacrificed humans for it.

“Food of the Gods is inspired by the site – which is in Broadmead, Bristol – where the Fry company invented the chocolate bar, the easter egg and Turkish delight.”

Student: Kayla Haughton
Course: BA (Hons) Interior Design


Architectural drawing of a large structure

A Hinterland of Exchange by Imogen Kemp

“Through the examination and development of a practise based on the use of cuts and folds across a plethora of media, this project focuses on the productive entanglement of Rome’s trades – past, present and future.

“Situated in the heart of Rome’s hinterland, the proposal aims to repossess the abandoned ‘industrial colosseum’ (gas factory) as an area of commerce and industrial production.

“The project reinstates wine production in the Testaccio District while reconnecting the city with the ancient craft of glass blowing, offering a point of exchange between local produce and knowledge.”

Student: Imogen Kemp
Course: MArch Architecture
Tutor: Dr Fidel Meraz and Andrew Bourne


Four double page spreads of a magazine with text and images

Labouring to Remain Illegible by Eloise Aitken

“This project is a collative research publication with essays on radical publishing and lo-fi design, including my own dissertation, which advocates for the value of the ‘low resolution’ image.

“The content offers ideas on the relationship that designers have with wider social discussions and how this is shown through design elements and aesthetics.

“With everything from punk fanzine design from the 70s to theories on the future of ‘post-internet’ art, the publication offers an eclectic range of research on radical design theory.”

Student: Eloise Aitken
Course: BA (Hons) Graphic Design
Tutor: Colum Leith


Visualisation showing a figure hanging onto a balcony

The Feather and the Rock by Archie MacLeod

“The relevant images were not necessarily created for one specific project or brief but instead share the common denominator of improving my ability to situate characters in more impressive environments.

“Architecture and location has become a prevalent subject of my artwork where it used to be dominated by portraiture and the character.

“I almost never use reference when curating imagery however there is certainly a strong sense of New York or the ‘American mega-city’.

“This highlights the extent to which Hollywood and or the American film industry has impacted upon my subconscious – for I have never experienced it first hand.”

Student: Archie MacLeod
Course: BA (Hons) Illustration


Visualisation showing an amphitheatre-like space with tiered seating

Unite As One To Make A Change Together by Nikola Asojana

“The activist hub ‘Ground for Change’ has found its place in Bristol, a city known for its rebellious history and people ready to stand up for their beliefs.

“This project aims to bring together activists and residents, providing spaces for every voice to be heard.

“The building embodies honesty and transparency through its raw materials, visible structure and open spaces overlooking each other.

“The ideas expressed in constructivism and high-tech architecture define the project through functionality, progress and ambition to evolve.

“The main forum space overlooks a new square, inviting a diverse community to shape the city together.”

Student: Nikola Asojana
Course: BEng (Hons) Architecture and Environmental Engineering
Tutor: Dr Karl Hutchison and Chris Puttick


Birds eye view visualisations and photographs of models

Museum of Rome by Toby Grimwood-Snook

“In 1932, Benito Mussolini demolished a significant area of Rome from the Colosseum to the Monument of Victor Emmanuel II, constructing the Via dei Fori Imperiali.

“Symbolising his regime and showcasing his aspirations, the road bisected the medieval urban streetscape and ancient Roman Forums below, excavating thousands of artefacts that were hastily stored away during its construction.

“This project proposes dismantling Mussolini’s road to reconnect the Roman Forums and creatively display the recovered artefacts.

“The Museum of Rome aims to reclaim and reinterpret this urban space, providing a fresh perspective on navigating and experiencing the romanticized remnants of ancient Rome.”

Student: Toby Grimwood-Snook
Course: MArch Architecture
Tutor: Dr Fidel Meraz and Andrew Bourne

Partnership content

This school show is a partnership between Dezeen and University of West England (UWE). Find out more about Dezeen partnership content here.

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Modular and multi-functional shelf and mirror is an aesthetic addition to your space

Normally, the shelves that I look for or I actually get have one purpose only: to hold and store my books. And I have a lot, and I mean a lot, of books. But there are times when I want to be able to get something that is also decorative or can be a conversation piece (although that still hasn’t happened yet since I still need for it to just be functional). A lot of designers now are creating ideas, concepts, and sometimes actual products, that can be multi-functional and modular and shelves are no exceptions.

Designer: João Teixeira

Wave is a conceptual design for a shelf that also doubles as a mirror. Even better, it is modular so you can arrange it into different layouts, depending on your need, your preference, or your mood. Just don’t expect a full mirror of course since the shelf part and the shape of the entire thing can be a bit obtrusive. But if you’re just looking for a surface that can hold your books, decorations, and other knick knacks that happens to have a mirror attached to it, then this is something you will be interested in.

Since the concept is named Wave, the shape of the mirror and the shelves is wavy and reminiscient of the letter S. It is modular yes but no matter where you place the different parts, you’ll still get the wave. The renders show that there are around 4-5 parts that you can assemble and play around with, depending on where you want to place the shelves part or if you want it to be horizontal or vertical in orientation.

If what you really want is to look fully in a mirror, you may be annoyed with the way this is designed. But if this gets made into an actual product, those who will buy it will probably just see the mirror as part of the whole design of the multi-functional shelf. You can also probably only just place a few objects on it (most likely not part of my book collection) but again, this is more for the added aesthetics rather than a fully functional piece of furniture.

The post Modular and multi-functional shelf and mirror is an aesthetic addition to your space first appeared on Yanko Design.

Industrial Design Case Study: A Portable Imaging Tool

Canfield Scientific, a manufacturer of imaging systems for science and healthcare applications, wanted to refresh their Vectra H1 handheld system. They contacted industrial design and engineering consultancy HSD, a/k/a/ HS Design. “HSD worked to not only aid in improving lighting and imaging quality, but also to incorporate Canfield Scientific’s new brand language into the revitalized design,” the firm writes.

The VECTRA H2 is a portable imaging solution that allows users to capture high resolution 3D images of both the face and body. With a fully automated solution that maps images of the body captured by a 24 mega-pixel DSLR camera and studio-quality non-polarized and cross-polarized lighting that is housed within the system, VECTRA 2 makes it possible to carry a studio-level imaging experience with you. This new imaging solution establishes the VECTRA H2 as an advanced, portable, and professional imaging tool.

DESIGN EVOLUTION

Canfield Scientific asked HSD to revisit the successful VECTRA H1 in order to incorporate their new lighting and imaging technology in a compact, user friendly design. The size and portability of the product required our designers to consider the human factors behind how one would both store and interact with the VECTRA H2 during use.

Full-scale foam mockups were created to properly evaluate the design and use of the system firsthand. Various flash hood iterations were explored to ultimately land on a hinge-based solution that allowed the VECTRA H2 to provide studio quality lighting while being able to be stored in a compact and lens protecting configuration. Canfield Scientific’s new design brand language was applied to ensure the product lived with the Canfield Scientific suite of products and would stand out as a professional imaging solution.

ENGINEERING

The VECTRA H2 houses a complex assembly of imaging technology that allows the user to have portable studio quality lighting and photography. It contains two independent sets of ranging lights that help users capture high quality images of both the face and body. HSD engineers worked with Canfield Scientific to realize the complex surface geometries that the design and brand language envisioned. A robust hinge mechanism and magnetic snaps allow for a smooth and enjoyable user interaction while raising and closing the flash hood.

USABILITY

The size and portability of the product required our designers to consider the human factors behind how one would both store and interact with the VECTRA H2. While in use, the hood hinges up to reflect the flash onto the subject. The interior geometry, material, and positioning of this large white flash hood allow for greater, studio-quality lighting with each image. In the stored state, the flash hood is folded downward and secured with magnets to protect the lens. A slight foot was added to the base of the VECTRA H2 to prevent tipping when placed on a tabletop or flat surface.

You can see more of HS Design’s work here.