Two white volumes frame central courtyard of Vermont home by Birdseye Design

A pair of buildings with pitched roofs and white-washed exteriors form this home in rural Vermont by design-build studio Birdseye Design.

The project, aptly named Two Shed, is located in the village of Waterbury in the northern US state. Design and construction were taken on by the same team, ensuring a streamlined process.

Two Shed by Birdseye

The two volumes that make up the residence sit either side of a central exterior space. The main part of the home lies to the north, facing a secondary volume to the south.

A continuous wall on the western facade connects both parts of the home. This protects the home from noise from a nearby highway, and an opening in the barrier serves as the residence’s main entrance.

Two Shed by Birdseye

“From the western auto court, a path of river birch and raised garden beds made of white painted steel define the entry sequence,” said Birdseye Design. “The path leads through a pierced common wall to an interior courtyard flanked by parallel shed structures.”

The courtyard is positioned to take advantage of mountain vistas that are available from the elevated site.

Two Shed by Birdseye

“The design orients toward mountain views to the east and acts as a buffer to the northern village light and western highway noise,” said the architects.

Both volumes are accessible via the courtyard. In the main building, a small vestibule at the centre of the longitudinal structure separates public and private programmes.

Two Shed by Birdseye

Two bedrooms, two bathrooms, and utility rooms are located to the west. To the east, a sequence of spaces for entertaining culminates in a double-height living room.

In this space, a prominent white metal staircase leads to the second floor, where the architects laid out a home office, two bedrooms, and an exercise room.

Two Shed by Birdseye

Birdseye mainly used white-coloured materials for both inside the home and out.

“A palette of white stained western red cedar shingles and repurposed snow fencing, oriented vertically, clad the contemporary shed shapes,” said the studio.

Two Shed by Birdseye

Inside, a similar surface treatment was used. The clients wanted ample space to display their art, so the interior decor is subdued.

Birdseye Design also recently completed a similarly shed-like project in Vermont, which serves as a guesthouse and is clad in salvaged wood.

Two Shed by Birdseye

Other projects in New England include a home in Maine raised up on stilts that lift it above the water and a longitudinal residence clad in black cypress, located in Massachusetts.

Photography is by Jim Westphalen.


Project Credits:

Firm of record: Birdseye Design
Architect: Brian Mac
Interior design: Brooke Michelsen Design
Structural: Engineering Ventures
Landscape: Wagner Hodgson Landscape Architects
Builder: Birdseye

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Luca Nichetto fills room with totem-like glass lamps for Decode/Recode exhibition

Colourful blown-glass totems by Luca Nichetto are among the works in Decode/Recode, Venetian glassmaker Salviati’s exhibition at Milan design week.

Decode Recode by Salviati

Exploring the potential of modular glassware, each of the illuminated objects is made from several stacked pieces.

Decode Recode by Salviati

Named Pyrae, the installation features 53 totems made from different combinations. Some sit on vase-shaped bases, while others are supported by small half-domes. Some elements are finished in milky colours, while others feature patterned or ridged exteriors.

To create the collection, Nichetto first designed a set of 25 base modules, which were then made using one of ten traditional techniques, in 15 colours. This made for thousands of possible unique combinations.

Decode Recode by Salviati

“A fascination for the depiction of human forms through culture and history – for the idea of character – here materialises in 34 different objects,” said Nichetto, who created his first piece for Salviati when he was 23.

The designer has also worked with Claesson Koivisto Rune and created modular lighting for Hem.

“Exploring the expressive potential of Salviati glass, we used colour and technique to design simple modules that, combined, introduce the possibility to create more than 10,000 unique and original figures, no one the same, each one beautifully proportioned.”

Decode Recode by Salviati

According to Salviati, which has been working with traditional Murano glass for over 150 years, the exhibition is intended to explore how centuries-old methods can be combined with contemporary aesthetics.

It’s also an experimentation into the different ways glass can be adapted to form modular objects.

Decode Recode by Salviati

Salviati has also partnered with Ben Gorham, founder of fragrance and accessory brand Byredo, on a second piece, named Strata. Gorham created mini carousels of glass panels, which were then hung alongside and above each other to create an illuminated tower.

Decode Recode by Salviati

“Because of the qualities of glass, we could develop the concepts of stackability and layering,” said Gorham, who set up Byredo in 2006.

“The interaction of each piece determines variations in colours, textures, figures: it was natural to think how glass interacts with other parts and with the light.”

Decode Recode by Salviati

Decode/Recode is on display at Ventura Centrale, a new Milan design week district located around the Central Station. The exhibition is on from 4 to 9 April on Via Ferrante Aporti 19.

Also on within the new district is Lee Broom’s Time Machine, for which he filled a modernist-inspired carousel with products he has designed over the past decade.

Images by Mattia Balsamini and Maurizio Polese.

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Dezeen at IKEA Festival: Teenage Engineering shows off portable music machines

Teenage Engineering is at IKEA Festival today giving demos of its Pocket Operator range of music devices after performing interactive synth shows for visitors in Milan this week.

In our latest broadcast from IKEA Festival, we speak to Tobias von Hofsten from Teenage Engineering about the Swedish tech company’s Pocket Operator – a handheld sequencer, synthesiser and sampler for creating electronic music.

“We like to spread music and we do that through machines,” he explains.

“The Pocket Operators are handheld, battery-powered, portable music devices that allow anybody to make electronic music. It has a small sequencer, press play and you’ve got yourself a beat very quickly.”

Members of Teenage Engineering performed at the Dezeen at IKEA Festival party on Wednesday night, and have entertained festival-goers with interactive sound and light shows each day.

IKEA Festival takes place from 4 to 9 April in a 3,500-square-metre warehouse at Via Ventura 14 in Milan. We’re broadcasting video highlights across Dezeen, as well as our Facebook, Instagram and Twitter channels.

Watch the videos as we publish them at www.dezeen.com/ikeafestival.

Keep up with all our Milan coverage here, and use our #milanogram hashtag competition on Instagram for the chance of winning £500 to spend at Dezeen Watch Store.

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Bright white living spaces overhang gallery in top-heavy Tokyo house by Form

Japanese studio Form designed this top-heavy home for a family in Tokyo, placing their living spaces in an elevated volume that overhangs a gallery for its apron-designer owner.

Adorable House by Form

The Kusatsu-based studio was asked to create the small house to meet the demands of family life, but also those of the client, who designs aprons.

Covered in white render, Adorable House hosts a gallery and master bedroom below its overhanging first floor, where there is a children’s bedroom and an open-planned living space.

“The appearance has been designed to create both a massive and floaty feel,” said studio director Kouichi Kimura, who had to comply with strict building height regulations when designing the 97-square-metre home.

Adorable House by Form

“My works are characterised by poetic and functional minimalism, and a sense of openness and privacy, which is achieved through careful slicing and layering of wall elements, light and shadows and volumes and spaces,” he added.

Adorable House by Form

This aesthetic is most prominent in the overhanging first floor, which features a large window and skylights to create the illusion of an open, light-filled space that is suspended in mid-air.

Additionally, the minimal all-white interiors make the spaces feel large, and encourages the reflection of light throughout the home.

Adorable House by Form

The gallery space fronts the wooden-frame house and is set to the rear of a garden designed to create a pleasant public entrance, and a dialogue with a park located opposite the site.

Adorable House by Form

The gallery has its own entrance so that is distinguishable from the private living spaces, however a backdoor connects to the home’s hallway for the residents to access the room without going outside.

Adorable House by Form

To ensure floor space is maximised and the open white spaces are kept clutter free, simple wooden furniture is arranged around the edges of the rooms and the kitchen is set back behind a half-height wall.

Sliding doors were also chosen as a way to save space in the small home, while also providing a seamless finish to its interiors.

Adorable House by Form

The overhanging living spaces forms a canopy over the entrance, creating a porch and a space for the clients to park their car.

Adorable House by Form

Apollo Architects & Associates also recently completed a project where work and living spaces are combined – another top-heavy house in Japan that contains a gallery for displaying the client’s art collection.

Designers Lim + Lu also completed an apartment in Hong Kong to double as their showroom.

Photography is by Yoshihiro Asada

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Jasper Morrison references Japanese tatami mats for Camper sandals

Launched at Milan design week, Jasper Morrison‘s Ni-jo sandals for Camper borrow the minimal appearance of tatami mats.

Camper x Jasper Morrison Sandals

The shoes, which feature a simple white sole and a tatami insole, are named for the Japanese term for a pair of mats placed side by side.

Created as part of Camper‘s Together programme – which sees them partner with international designers on products and stores – the shoes are available in brown, green and white versions.

Camper x Jasper Morrison Sandals

The men’s sandal has velcro straps that cross over the top of the foot and behind the heel, while the women’s shoe is a slip-on with crossover straps.

The shoes are the latest in a series of collaborations between the British designer and the footwear brand, which has seen Morrison create stores and shoes, including a suede and canvas trainer.

Morrison is one of the world’s most well-known and influential industrial designers, and recently came fifth among designers in Dezeen Hot List.

Camper has previously worked with Brazilian designers Humberto and Fernando Camper to create shoes wrapped in suede webs, and with Japanese studio Nendo on trainers with a patterned lacing system.

Camper x Jasper Morrison Sandals

Beyond its footwear, the brand often commissions designers and architects to create installations or interiors for its stores. It collaborated with Neri&Hu for its Shanghai flagship, and with Brazilian architect Marko Brajovic on an installation made from 30,000 red shoelaces for its Melbourne store.

Morrison’s Ni-jo sandals are on show at Camper’s Montenapoleone store during Milan design week, which runs from 3 to 9 Apri.

Several other fashion brands have taken the opportunity to show new products during the fair, including Jil Sander, which has produced a capsule collection made using a Nendo print, and COS, which worked with Studio Swine to produce a bubble-blowing tree installation.

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Dezeen at IKEA Festival: robot paints student artwork on day five

It’s a busy Saturday at IKEA Festival in Milan, and in our latest video update we speak to the creator of a robot that paints with brushstrokes like a human.

Engineer Patric Lüthi’s machine applies acrylic paint to a huge canvas using nozzles that imitate brush strokes of varying widths. He is demonstrating the robot’s capabilities by painting artworks by students from Swiss university ÉCAL.

“The painting robot uses acrylic colour on a canvas, which allows us to produce paintings in an industrial way,” Lüthi explains.

“We want to produce affordable paintings with a quality as if made by a human.”

The artworks created at the festival are prototypes, but Lüthi believes his machine could eventually mass-produce paintings to be sold in IKEA.

IKEA Festival takes place from 4 to 9 April in a 3,500-square-metre warehouse at Via Ventura 14 in Milan. We’re broadcasting video highlights across Dezeen, as well as our Facebook, Instagram and Twitter channels.

Watch the videos as we publish them at www.dezeen.com/ikeafestival.

Keep up with all our Milan coverage here, and use our #milanogram hashtag competition on Instagram for the chance of winning £500 to spend at Dezeen Watch Store.

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How to Build a One-Legged Cabinet, a Throwing Star Fidget Spinner, Infuse Golden Veins Into Concrete & More

MakerSpace Cabinet w/ Dovetail & Secret Drawers

Linn from Darbin Orvar builds out a useful storage cabinet with a bunch of flat, wide drawers, then uses up some dead space at the bottom for a secret compartment:

Building Vanity Cabinets

Sandra Powell cranks out the carcase for a custom dual-sink vanity cabinet:

Laura´s Unrideable Beastbike

It’s always fun watching Laura Kampf build one of her bicycle experiments, even if this one turns out to be unrideable:

Turning a Failed Project Into a New Technique

When a concrete slab accidentally cracks, Jessie Uyeda uses it as an opportunity to experiment with giving it the kintsugi treatment. (“Kintsugi,” literally “golden joinery” in Japanese, is often applied to broken pottery to both recognize and beautify the damage.)

DIY Concrete and Gold Table

Jessie’s brother Ben modifies the technique slightly, figuring out a simple, controlled way to induce the “crack:”

Making A Steel Shuriken Fidget Spinner

John Heisz is full of surprises this week. Number one: I didn’t think he’d ever make something like a throwing star fidget spinner. Number two: I had no idea what kind of music he’d be into, but I didn’t think it’d be this!

Designing and Building A One Legged Cabinet

Chris Salomone embarks on an interesting furniture design experiment, and I give the results a thumbs-up:

Making a Stained Glass Hourglass

From Dustin Penner, this is definitely one of the more unusual materials and resultant object we’ve seen in the Makers Roundup: