Het Zilte Westen Pop Up Book

Edité par Stijn Vanderhaeghe et conçu par le designer Tim Bisschop, le livre pop-up « Het Zilte Westen » est une ode à la culture flamande avec des dessins, des photos, des caricatures, des poèmes de divers écrivains et artistes. Le bouquin commence par une sculpture en papier réalisée par Wim Opbrouck. Vous pouvez commander une édition ici.

Artistes présents dans le livre : Jan Bucquoy, Elsie Helewaut Anne Provoost, Marijke Pinoy, Karl Vannieuwkerke, Luc Devoldere, Johny Vansevenant, Kobe Desramaults Etienne Vermeersch David Van Reybrouck, Wim Delvoye, Wannes Cappelle, Sam Louwyck, Ann De Craemer, Jan Puype Bert Bultinck, Annelien Coorevits Hugo Camps, Dominique Persoone, Kurt Van Eeghem, Wim Chielens, Carl Devos.
Photographes : Jelle Vermeersch, Nyk Dekeyser, Thomas Sweertvaegher, Harry Gruyaert, Carl Dekeyzer, Herman Selleslags Marc Lagrange, Michiel Hendryckx Danny Willems, Stephan Vanfleteren.

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Portuguese office by GGLL Atelier is a grey box punctured by a grid of holes

GGLL Atelier has converted a villa in Cascais, Portugal, into a monolithic office building featuring a smattering of square holes that let dappled light reach the interior (+ slideshow).

Office Conversion in Cascais by GGLL Atelier

Portuguese studio GGLL Atelier was asked to repurpose a villa in a residential area surrounded by 1970s apartment blocks, to create a flexible commercial premises for an accounting firm based in nearby Lisbon.

Office Conversion in Cascais by GGLL Atelier

The client asked for a solution that would allow it to occupy the entire building itself or rent out some of the offices to other businesses.



It also requested a design with a bold external shape and facade treatment to differentiate it from its neighbours.

Office Conversion in Cascais by GGLL Atelier

“The facade scheme and its grey materiality was used to make the small building stand out in the middle of the surrounding residential area and also to reflect the general image of the accounting company,” the architects told Dezeen.

Office Conversion in Cascais by GGLL Atelier

The volume of the existing villa was simplified to create a compact cubic form that reflects the arrangement of the offices inside.

Office Conversion in Cascais by GGLL Atelier

Existing brick walls were clad in an abstract arrangement of grey-painted insulating panels, intended to “distance the building from its original use.”

Office Conversion in Cascais by GGLL Atelier

New walls added to extend the structure at one corner were constructed using a steel frame covered in panels of oriented strand board. These are perforated by a pattern of small square apertures.

Office Conversion in Cascais by GGLL Atelier

The holes allow daylight to reach a terrace that wraps around two sides of the largest of three first-floor offices, while maintaining privacy for the occupants.

Office Conversion in Cascais by GGLL Atelier

“The scattered pattern on the south and west sides was made to rectify the shape of the building, while creating a kind of filter between the interior work spaces and the surrounding buildings,” the architects added.

Office Conversion in Cascais by GGLL Atelier

A hallway and staircase connecting the upper level with further offices on the ground floor are lined with concrete to create a tonal contrast with the white interiors of the work spaces.

Office Conversion in Cascais by GGLL Atelier

Square openings in the ceiling let light permeate this circulation area at the heart of the building and offer a visual connection with the exterior.

Office Conversion in Cascais by GGLL Atelier

Folding screens in one of the offices open to reveal a concealed kitchenette finished in a dark grey that maintains the project’s consistent monochrome palette.


Project credits:

Architecture: GGLL atelier – Gabriela Gonçalves, Leonel Lopes
Design team: José Doroana, Miguel Malaquias, Gary Barber, Alexandre Gonçalves
Structure: Fisprojota Lda
Builders: Batalha

Office Conversion in Cascais by GGLL Atelier

Ground floor plan – click for larger image

Office Conversion in Cascais by GGLL Atelier

First floor plan – click for larger image

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a grey box punctured by a grid of holes
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For New York Times Reporter, a Tom Brady Profile Years in the Making

NYTMag_02_01_2015At the top of this weekend’s New York Times Magazine cover story on Tom Brady, Mark Leibovich maps out the personal X’s and professional O’s that led him to finally score a profile of the NFL’s most frequent big game quarterback:

Last July, a few weeks before the New England Patriots started training camp, I got a call from Donald Yee, the agent in Los Angeles who has represented Tom Brady since he entered the NFL in 2000. It had been four years since I first told Yee that I was interested in writing about Brady, even though I typically cover politics.

I grew up in the Boston suburbs, rooted for the Patriots as a kid and even possessed vague memories of watching the team play at Fenway Park, one of their homes before they settled into the nowhere-land of Foxborough, MA, in 1971. My friend Josh and I once wrote a letter to the team’s young quarterback, Jim Plunkett, inviting him to dinner at Josh’s house. (Plunkett never responded.)

Yee offered Leibovich a lunch meeting with Brady, that same summer week. The day of the meeting, the reporter received an email with the subject line: “Tom Brady Here.” In short order, Leibovich was in the back of taxi cab, headed to 23rd and Madison for almonds, water in a blue bottle and conversation with a subject who never slouches.

For the piece, Leibovich also spoke to Brady’s father, Patriots owner Robert Kraft and the quarterback’s ever-present personal body coach Alex Guerrero, a “practicing Mormon of Argentine descent with a master’s degree in Chinese medicine.” Read the full piece here.

Dark Atmospheric Pictures by Korinne Bisig

Korinne Bisig est une photographe de 16 ans, actuellement basée à Seattle. Tombée dans la marmite toute petite en suivant les pas de son père dès l’âge de 12 ans, Korinne aborde la photographie comme la manière la plus simple de raconter une histoire ou exprimer une émotion, l’expérience avant tout. A travers un protagoniste féminin, nous voici donc plongés dans l’univers sombre et atmosphérique de cette jeune fille promise à un brillant avenir.

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Shane Schneck's Bollard light is four lamps in one

Northmodern 2015: American designer Shane Schneck has created a silicone lamp for Danish brand Menu that can be used in four different positions.

Bollard Lamp by Shame Schneck for Menu

Diffused light comes from the circular end of the conical Bollard light, designed for Menu by Shane Schneck.



“The form of a lamp is the result of a desire to re-imagine the typical pendant, made possible by adapting LED technology and high-density silicone,” said Schneck, whose studio Office for Design is based in Stockholm.

Bollard Lamp by Shame Schneck for Menu

Schneck introduced a small lip around the tip of the cone to form a circular base and a slot that allows the electric cable to switch position.

Bollard Lamp by Shame Schneck for Menu

“With study models we realised adding a ‘collar’ and clip on the side would add three positions to the typical pendant scenario,” Schneck told Dezeen.

Bollard Lamp by Shame Schneck for Menu

The lamp can hang vertically as a pendant or be angled as spotlight when the cable is clipped into the groove, halfway down the shape.

Bollard Lamp by Shame Schneck for Menu

Due to its conical form, Bollard is also able to rest on its side for directional illumination or stood up on its base to point light up at the ceiling.

Bollard Lamp by Shame Schneck for Menu

 

Wrapped in a silicone skin that is moulded in a single piece, the lamp is available in colours including pale green, ash, nude, black or carbon grey.

Bollard Lamp by Shame Schneck for Menu

“Silicone with a high shore is flexible enough that the entire body can be produced in one piece,” said Schneck. “Economy is also a leading factor as the Bollard will be half the cost of traditional pendants.”

Bollard Lamp by Shame Schneck for Menu

The lamp was launched at the inaugural Northmodern trade fair in Copenhagen, which took place earlier this month.

Bollard Lamp by Shame Schneck for Menu

Also at the event, Menu released a range of homeware accessories in pale oak and pastel colours intended to “stay classy for generations”.

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Readers Mock National Geographic Ranking of Top Nightlife Cities

NatGeoNightlifeTopThreeThe book came out last fall. And from it, this week, National Geographic shared the world’s “Top 10 Nightlife Cities.”

The only American destination on the list is Houston at #8, beating out a number of other seemingly more logical U.S.A. candidates. Internationally, it’s the same; the book and magazine publisher has tackled an impossible task and made it worse. For example, many are criticizing the fact that for the brief blurb about number one party city Dublin, the magazine highlights a tourist-trap bar. On the National Geographic Facebook page, the negative comments outweigh the positive by a ratio of about 10-to-1. Here are just a few relating to the American entry:

Alan Foster: I’m from Texas. Houston really must have been drunk before you got there.

Bill Hanna: Houston before Bangkok? Is this a joke?

Joe Garrick: Houston over New Orleans or Vegas? This is bupkis.

Jackie L. Taylor: Houston? Really?

Jim Hoffman: Houston????

Houston FOX-TV reporter Ashley Johnson hit the streets to report on the ranking, one which had her news desk co-anchor Chris Stipes somewhat stunned. Hilariously, the Washington Ave. piece was done in broad daylight and features as its first talking head a Teitlist cap-wearing golfer. Extra deadpan points to the afternoon businessman reveler who tells the reporter: “Oh, it’s dynamic. We’ve got oil and gas, and we’ve got oil and gas, and we’ve got oil and gas.” (Or as Matthew McConaughey might put it: “All wrong, all wrong, all wrong!”)

FOX 26 News | MyFoxHouston

Concrete Cabin by Nickisch Sano Walder

Le studio d’architecture allemand Nickisch Sano Walder Architekten a déconstruit une cabane alpine en bois pour recréer un refuge en béton avec la même forme que son prédécesseur. Un moulage de l’ancienne bâtisse a ainsi été réalisé pour créer la nouvelle armature. La modernité du béton rend ainsi un très bel hommage à la noblesse du bois.

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Illuminated nightscapes were captured from a speeding car for Sunken Foal's music video

Music: footage taken through a car windscreen of a town after dark was manipulated by director Kevin McGloughlin to create this music video for electronic act Sunken Foal.

Sunken Foal video by Kevin McGloughlin

Accompanying a subdued, atmospheric song named Never Knew, Kevin McGloughlin’s video features colourful patterns and shapes that spread across the screen – twisting and blending into one another against a dark background.



Sunken Foal video by Kevin McGloughlin

A sense of both forward and backward motion features throughout the clip, created by imagery appearing to rush either from or past the edges of the video frame.

Sunken Foal video by Kevin McGloughlin

Occasionally, recognisable objects like street signs and lighting displays can be picked out among the blurs.

Sunken Foal video by Kevin McGloughlin

“The concept for the video came from wanting to explore the idea of time perception in relation to emotion,” Ireland-based McLaughlin told Dezeen. “I thought time-lapse would be a good place to start – visually and conceptually.”

Sunken Foal video by Kevin McGloughlin

The shooting process consisted of McGloughlin filming through the windscreen of a moving car, using a DSLR camera to capture footage of different types of lights he encountered.

Sunken Foal video by Kevin McGloughlin

While driving around at night, the director filmed with a shallow depth of field that he constantly adjusted to create intentional lens blur and capture the abstract visuals.

Sunken Foal video by Kevin McGloughlin

The director took three evening car trips through parts of County Sligo, Ireland, to record the hour of footage needed for the film.

Sunken Foal video by Kevin McGloughlin

“The process was very enjoyable,” he said. “It was just a case of filming street lights and making tonnes of happy mistakes.”

Sunken Foal video by Kevin McGloughlin

During sections of the journeys, McGloughlin also took photographs at regular intervals to stitch together into time-lapse sequences.

Sunken Foal video by Kevin McGloughlin

After all of the photographs were captured, they were stacked into layers within a 3D software environment.

Sunken Foal video by Kevin McGloughlin

This technique created an illusion of depth, allowing the director to move a virtual camera through the images to create a sense of forward motion for the viewer. The opening few seconds of the film demonstrate this technique.

Sunken Foal video by Kevin McGloughlin

A similar approach was used for the live-action sections, with McGloughlin creating duplicates of the footage and overlaying them. Each duplicate plays one frame later than the previous duplicate, giving viewers the impression that they are moving through the footage.

Sunken Foal video by Kevin McGloughlin

Additional editing and post-production techniques such as the mirroring and morphing of images were used in the video, which took around a month and a half to complete.

Sunken Foal video by Kevin McGloughlin

Never Knew features vocals by Si Shroeder and is available to download for free from Sunken Foal’s website.

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speeding car for Sunken Foal’s music video
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Black and White Kaleidoscopic Creatures

Après sa vidéo Inside Me, l’artiste Dmitry Zakharov revient avec le projet « Creatures, Gods and Architectures ». En noir et blanc, il a capturé des photos d’une expérience d’escalade avec un effet kaléidoscopique. Ce travail combine des parties de structures en pierre et des corps humains où on peut deviner quelques tatouages.

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Dreamlike Underwater Series

Dans le cadre de créations publicitaires, la talentueuse photographe Susanne Stemmer se plaît à photographier ses modèles sous l’eau. Avec un style changeant en fonction des campagnes, l’artiste nous livre ici une série tout droit sortie d’un rêve, où les modèles enveloppées de draps légers semblent flotter dans une eau merveilleuse. À découvrir.

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