The Hashy bottle deserves to be in a contemporary art museum

If I asked you to imagine a water bottle, you’d probably think of a flimsy, disposable plastic PET bottle with a branding-label around its waist. Even if you go a step further to look at reusable plastic bottles or even metal thermoses, there’s an underlying design that unites all of them into an invisible category. This invisible category (which helps you differentiate between the bottle designs for water, or beer, or ketchup) is a nice guideline to follow, but more often than not, it results in a lot of products looking insipidly similar.

Every once in a while a product comes and shatters the mold, creating a design that uses new materials, or boasts of a new form that instantly sets it apart. The Hashy does both. Utilizing materials that are relatively new to water-bottle-design, and a form factor that takes heavy inspiration from perfume bottles, the Hashy is bold, eye-catching, and is a pretty great water bottle/thermos too!

At first glance, the Hashy stands out, with its perfume-bottle inspired design. Its redesigned cap takes heavy visual cues from vintage perfume bottles with their spherical lids. Implemented on a water bottle, it instantly sets the Hashy apart, imparting a premium look to the flask.

The Hashy comes with a double-wall stainless steel construction, and keeps beverages cold for 24 hours, and warm for 12 hours. A frosted matte finish on the outside makes the Hashy look cool and collected, while the bottle’s cap remains one of the most visually and tactually pleasing caps ever. The spherical detail feels great to wrap your palm around and grip onto, whether it’s for holding, or for opening/closing. Open the cap, and the bottle features a wider-than-28mm neck that’s perfectly size-calibrated for sipping, as well as for putting ice-cubes into.

Hashy’s design also employs the use of materials you wouldn’t associate with water bottles. Hashy’s body is crafted from 304 Stainless steel, and the bottle even comes paired with a chic looking leather holder that further adds a touch of class to the bottle. Designed with an aesthetic that could just as easily one-up the luxurious effect of a Perrier or Evian, the Hashy carries the advantage of not only holding more water, but also the ability to be used and reused for years. The bottle comes in three colors, with a snowy white, a matte black, and chic grey that beautifully subdues harsh reflections with its satin finish. Pair it with the full-body leather carrying strap, and the Hashy becomes a style statement… a distinction that’s rather rare with water bottles, but a distinction the Hashy wears rather proudly on its sleeve!

Designer: Daniel Joo

Click Here To Buy Now: $23 $35 (35% off). Hurry, less than 36 hours left for this Special Pricing!

Hashy Bottle: The Most Elegant & Classic Water Bottle Ever! Crafted from Reusable Insulated Stainless Steel Water Bottle it is elegantly designed to keep you hydrated all day. Hashy even keeps beverages hot or cold for hours.

At first glance, the Hashy stands out, with its perfume-bottle inspired design. Its redesigned cap takes heavy visual cues from vintage perfume bottles with their spherical lids. Implemented on a water bottle, it instantly sets the Hashy apart, imparting a premium look to the flask.

The Hashy comes with a double-wall stainless steel construction, and keeps beverages cold for 24 hours, and warm for 12 hours.

Designed with an aesthetic that could just as easily one-up the luxurious effect of a Perrier or Evian, the Hashy carries the advantage of not only holding more water, but also the ability to be used and reused for years.

A frosted matte finish on the outside makes the Hashy look cool and collected, while the bottle’s cap remains one of the most visually and tactually pleasing caps ever. The spherical detail feels great to wrap your palm around and grip onto, whether it’s for holding, or for opening/closing.

Carry Your Bottle Wherever You Go: Hashy’s hand-crafted leather makes it easier to hold your water bottle by hand. They would be the perfect water bottle accessory for your active, on-the-go lifestyle.

Since you’re on the move most of the time, Hashy’s designer has created a leather strap that makes it easy to hold this bottle with just one hand, anywhere, anytime.

Open the cap, and the bottle features a wider-than-28mm neck that’s perfectly size-calibrated for sipping, as well as for putting ice-cubes into.

Click Here To Buy Now: $23 $35 (35% off). Hurry, Only 36 hours left for this Special Pricing!

WOJR envisions House of the Woodland topped with huge roof for Massachusetts forest

House of the Woodland by WOJR

This set of highly realistic renderings unveil a cabin that American studio WOJR has designed for a forest clearing in Massachusetts, featuring a large pyramidal metal roof set on concrete block walls. 

House of the Woodland is a family residence planned for a site in the Berkshires region in western Massachusetts. Envisioned as a retreat from city life, the cabin is intended to “frame the slow and deliberate rituals of respite”, according to WOJR, which is based in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

House of the Woodland by WOJR

Renderings of the 2,300-square-foot (214-square-metre) home show it will comprise eight walls concrete blocks walls separated by large stretches of glass.

Four large, intersecting plywood trusses sit atop the solid walls. The trusses allow for column-free spaces. while also supporting the roof structure. This is clad in standing-seam metal and punctured by four circular skylights set within square frames.

House of the Woodland by WOJR

Square in plan, the home’s design was influenced by the nine-square grid that has been used by architects for centuries. Some have argued that villas by 16th-century architect Andrea Palladio make use of the nine-square organisational device.

The plan was lated employed by Louis Kahn for Exteter Library, built in 1972, and by Shigeru Ban for his Nine Square Grid House, completed in 1997.

Perhaps most notably, American architect and professor John Hejduk developed a teaching approach in the 1950s known as the Nine Square Grid Problem.

To get his students thinking about architectural space, Hejduk required them to design a house using a nine-square grid. An exhibition about Hejduk’s approach was staged at Harvard University in 2016.

House of the Woodland by WOJR

These precedents played a role in the conception of the Berkshires cabin.

“The House of the Woodland employs a form of the nine-square grid, establishing a dialogue with the reoccurring use of this organisational typology throughout architectural history,” the studio said in a project description.

WOJR’s scheme departs from many other nine-square buildings in one significant way. The grid is only apparent in the ceiling plane and is not evident in the ground-floor plan.

House of the Woodland by WOJR

“The volume on the ground level of the building is evacuated of structure, allowing the nine-square grid to be present only in the figures tracing the large-scale coffers above,” the studio said.

The ground level contains an open-plan public zone, along with two symmetrical bedrooms. A metal ladder leads to a sleeping loft.

House of the Woodland by WOJR

The ground level is sunken 16 inches (41 centimetres) into the ground. The floor is ringed by a concrete bench, which can be used as seating and shelving. The bench also acts as a stair that enables entry and exit through the home’s glass doors.

The interior has a raw aesthetic, as shown in the set of highly realistic renderings by Los Angeles studio D-Render. Structural elements are left exposed, including the plywood ceiling and masonry walls.

House of the Woodland by WOJR

A net is suspended over a portion of the great room, adding a playful touch and allowing natural light from a skylight to penetrate the space.

“The House of the Woodland is fundamentally about the intangible generosity of space itself that allows everyday materials to be recast into a new and unexpected whole,” the firm said.

Construction of the residence is expected to begin within the next two years. The renderings of the home are unusual in that they capture the construction process –not just the finished dwelling.

House of the Woodland by WOJR

The visualisations are meant to convey a “slowness and an awareness of temporality” that permeate the project, from start to finish.

“There are three marked moments anticipated in the construction of the building that provide distinct experiences of the woodland,” the team said.

The first moment is the act of creating a space in the woods, which will occur when the concrete foundation is poured and the masonry walls are erected. The next moment entails protecting the space through the construction of a roof.

House of the Woodland by WOJR

In the final moment, the pavilion is filled with interior walls, glazing, and “other elements that make a building a home”.

WOJR was founded by William O’Brian Jr, a graduate of Harvard‘s architecture school and a professor at MIT. The studio has has designed a number of conceptual dwellings, including House of Horns in California, which features a dramatic roof that dips and swoops upward, and a forest cabin on stilts conceived for a grieving man.

Renderings are by D-Render.

Project credits:

Architect: WOJR
Design team: William O’Brien Jr, John David Todd, James Murray

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Organize your workspace with this 12-in-1 modular desk organizer

Throughout the working day, our desks can become cluttered and deeply unorganized messes that limit our potential through creating distractions and reducing efficiency. This is only made worse by the abundance of cables that weave around our desks. We need something that contains all the essential items and places them within one organized location. The Stealtho Desk organizer is here to do just that; It carries an array of features that keep everything you need in one tidy place!

Stealtho is the combination of both a humble desk organizer and Qi Wireless charger. This allows for easy access to essential writing equipment, whilst your phone can be simultaneously charged on the upright stand. With Stealtho, annoying dongles are a thing of the past; built-in to its base is a USB hub that enables efficient data-transfer or the charging of mobile devices.

This is certainly a productivity-increasing desk accessory that is packed full of functions to make your working day pass-by as smoothly as possible.

Designer: Vitaliy Savriga

Click Here To Buy Now: $99 $180 (45% off). Hurry, less than 24 hours left!

The Stealtho is a 12-in-1 modular desk organizer that pulls everything you require into a single, customizable and more functional location.

The first thing they combined was a desktop organizer and Qi Wireless Charger. This component gives you an easily accessible station for pens, markers, pencils and more, all while serving as a convenient charging station for your phone.

Their wireless charger is based on the Qi standard 10w output, which makes it compatible with a large range of Apple, Samsung, Sony, Nokia and other devices.

Get rid of wires and adapters for your MacBook, Air and Pro and save some cash!

Built into the utensil organizer and charger component is a USB hub. The hub allows you to quickly charge your tablet, laptop and power bank, and to use USB flash drives. You also can read micro SD cards from other devices, getting the data directly to your computer for your projects. The standard HDMI 2.0 port brings you the best in audio/visual quality.

The complete 12-in-1 STEALTHO organizer includes the following on the USB hub: 2 x USB3.0; 2 x USB type C; micro SD card reader; HDMI 2.0.

The tilt of the charging station is designed to give you the perfect viewing angle for device screens, making hands-free communication on popular platforms like Skype physically easier and more enticing. No more being distracted by an achy neck or grip!

Non-slip and non-scratching magnetic base.

A snap-and-fit style design that allows you to rearrange each piece of the organizer.

When your mobile phone is already charged, you can use the charging pad as a quick notes and writing board.

The sticky notes stand is also multifunctional. Use it as a copyholder to keep documents at the ready for reference. If you’re a music lover or just need some white noise to concentrate, use the stand to hold a pair of high-quality headphones.

Need a place to hold pushpins, paper clips and other small supplies? The sticky notes holder offers the perfect tray. The other side features four slots for your most valuable business cards, money or similar items.

Great idea? Need to remember a fact? The Post-it holder means paper is always there when you need it. If stickies aren’t your style, use this space to hold keys, earbuds or other items.

Click Here To Buy Now: $99 $180 (45% off). Hurry, less than 24 hours left!

Meet Anton Lorenz, the Man Who Brought Tubular Steel Furniture and Reclining Chairs to the Masses

To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Bauhaus this year, Vitra Design Museum is highlighting the work of a lesser-known yet key figure, the entrepreneur and designer Anton Lorenz who helped bring the promise of tubular steel furniture to life. The exhibition at Vitra Schaudepot in Weil am Rhein, Germany, titled “Anton Lorenz: From Avant-Garde to Industry,” looks at Lorenz’s legacy as the man behind the Bauhaus’ “machined aesthetic.” It traces his career, following him from Germany to the United States where he deployed his interest in ergonomics to develop some of the most popular reclining chairs in American furniture design history.

Anton Lorenz on a chair with a pillar made from glass (experiment), 1938/39

Lorenz was born in Budapest in 1891 and was teaching history and geography in a secondary school by 1913. Further details about his early life are unclear. He married an opera singer and they moved to Germany after she received a job in Leipzig, where he continued his teaching career. Somehow, he entered the lock manufacturing business and they relocated to Berlin in the early 1920s.

Smoking area in the day room of Anton Lorenz’s Berlin apartment, 1932

Cover of the Standardmo¨bel catalogue, 1927

In Berlin, Lorenz met fellow Hungarians and architects Marcel Breuer and Kalman Lengyel, who were both associated with the Bauhaus in Dessau. In 1925, Marcel Breuer became the first designer to construct furniture out of tubular steel and he joined forces with Lengyel to found the manufacturing firm Standard Möbel in 1927 as a way of developing his tubular steel designs. Before long, Lorenz became the manager at Standard Möbel where he used his business savvy to aggressively pursue patents and establish a network of rights of use for the new tubular steel furniture. He went on to do the same for Desta and Thonet and began to dominate the growing industry.

Photo from a test series at the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institute for Labor Physiology , Dortmund, 1938

Alongside this work, he showed a keen interest in ergonomic design, an area that was gaining popularity at that time. In the early 1930s, architect Hans Luckhardt was developing a slatted wooden chaise longue that allowed users to go from a slight to a full reclining position, and Lorenz funded extensive research at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute (now Max Planck) to support the design. To determine the precise angles of the body’s relaxed position, he had subjects sit in tanks of salt water and photographed their legs. Luckhardt’s final design went on to become the popular Siesta Medizinal for Thonet, a version of which was used in German military hospitals.

Look what Barcalo has done for TV viewers…, brochure by Barcalo, not dated

The chair a man can call his own… brochure by Futorian on the Stratolounger, 1967

Stratolounger 6100, (demonstration model with plexiglass relaxing position), ca. 1960

In 1939, Lorenz emigrated to the United States and established a now ubiquitous furniture typology: the adjustable recliner, a beloved centerpiece in living rooms across the country. In the USA, Lorenz again collaborated with many companies and profited from the increasing interest in comfortable, informal furniture that reflected the growing presence of television and aspirations toward leisure. He developed his own design, the BarcaLounger, in 1940, which became one of the most successful products in the history of American furniture design, and later partnered with Chicago upholsterer Morris Futorian to create the Stratolounger.

Model for the visualization of the mechanism of a moving chair, fabricated on the occasion of a lawsuit Lorenz versus Berkline, 1963

The new exhibition is the first to take a deeper look at Lorenz’s vast career, which has mostly been mired in some well-known court cases and copyright scandals. Vitra Design Museum acquired the archives of Lorenz’s estate in 1989 and now, for the first time, the museum is presenting important documents from this collection alongside furniture designs by Marcel Breuer, Mart Stam, and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe as well as pieces by Lorenz himself, to show a behind-the-scenes look at how he adapted Bauhaus designs to have broad appeal.

“He lived for his wife and his chairs,” Lorenz’s lawyer once said.

“It becomes clear that the breakthrough of modern furniture did not solely result from ingenious designs,” note the exhibition curators. “Equally important were companies, legal cases, patents, manufacturing methods – and innovators like Anton Lorenz, who merged all of these aspects to bring the ideas of the avant-garde to as many people as possible.”

“Anton Lorenz: From Avant-Garde to Industry” is on view through May 19, 2019.

Design Job: Standard International is Seeking a Design Development Manager in New York, NY

Responsible for supporting the Design Department in creating space planning studies, plan layouts and design drawings, design briefs, design presentations and 3D studies as needed. Instrumental in supporting team in all project management tasks. Job Duties: Responsible for assisting the Design Department

View the full design job here

Scientists turn carbon dioxide back into coal

RMIT university CO2 into coal

Carbon dioxide could be removed from the atmosphere and stored as a solid in a bid to manage climate change, using a new technique pioneered at Australia’s RMIT University.

The research team turned CO2 into a coal-like solid, in what could be a potential negative emission technology that actively removes a greenhouse gas from our atmosphere.

To keep climate change at a manageable level, the United Nations considers some kind of carbon dioxide-removal process a necessity.

One of the current most-discussed methods for sucking CO2 from the atmosphere involves storing it as a liquid deep underground, raising concerns about potential leaks.

First safe conversion of CO2 into a solid without high heat

The international team behind the latest research says their method is a safe and permanent alternative.

“While more research needs to be done, it’s a crucial first step to delivering solid storage of carbon,” said RMIT researcher Torben Daeneke.

Although the researchers are not the first to convert carbon dioxide gas into a solid, they are the first to do so without needing an unsustainable level of high heat.

“To date, CO2 has only been converted into a solid at extremely high temperatures, making it industrially unviable,” continued Daeneke. “By using liquid metals as a catalyst, we’ve shown it’s possible to turn the gas back into carbon at room temperature, in a process that’s efficient and scalable.”

The team detailed their electrochemical technique in a paper published in the journal Nature Communications in February.

Their process involved creating a particular liquid metal, which they combine with CO2 gas and electrolyte liquid in a beaker. When an electrical current is run through it, the gas slowly converts into “flakes” of solid carbon.

Solid carbon produced can hold electric charge

The solid carbon is similar to but not exactly the same as coal. In fact, it has additional useful properties.

“A side benefit of the process is that the carbon can hold electrical charge, becoming a supercapacitor, so it could potentially be used as a component in future vehicles,” said the paper’s lead author, Dorna Esrafilzadeh.

“The process also produces synthetic fuel as a by-product, which could have industrial applications.”

As well as RMIT’s MicroNano Research Facility and the RMIT Microscopy and Microanalysis Facility, the project involved researchers from seven other institutions.

They worked under lead investigator Kourosh Kalantar-Zadeh, now a professor of chemical engineering at University of New South Wales.

The United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change considers carbon capture and storage separately to other, more controversial geo-engineering techniques such as dimming the sun.

Although no technology has yet been effectively scaled up, several small carbon capture projects are underway, such as ClimeWorks’ CO2-sucking factory in Switzerland.


Project credits:

Project lead: Kourosh Kalantar-Zadeh, UNSW
Lead institution: RMIT
Researcher institutions: RMIT University, University of Munster, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, North Carolina State University, University of New South Wales, University of Wollongong, Monash University, Queensland University of Technology.

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Snøhetta completes Europe's first underwater restaurant in Norway

Europe's first underwater restaurant, Under, by Snohetta in Båly, south Norway

Snøhetta has completed Under, the “world’s largest underwater restaurant“, which plunges from a craggy shoreline in the remote village of Båly, Norway.

Designed by Snøhetta to resemble a sunken periscope, the 495-square-metre restaurant is fronted by a huge panoramic window that gives visitors a “unique view” of marine life.

The building on Norway’s southern coast, which can seat up to 40 people and will also be used as a marine research centre, is Europe’s first underwater restaurant.

Europe's first underwater restaurant, Under, by Snohetta in Båly, south Norway

“For most of us, this is a totally new world experience. It’s not an aquarium, it’s the wildlife of the North Sea. That makes it much more interesting. It takes you directly into the wildness,” Rune Grasdal, lead architect of Under, told Dezeen.

“If the weather is bad, it’s very rough. It’s a great experience, and to sit here and be safe, allowing the nature so close into you. It’s a very romantic and nice experience.”

Europe's first underwater restaurant, Under, by Snohetta in Båly, south Norway
Photo is by Inger Marie Grini/Bo Bedre Norge

Under was designed to be as simple as possible. It takes the form of a monolithic “concrete tube” that is 34 metres in length.

The walls are slightly curved and half-a-metre thick, providing optimal resistance against the forces of waves and water pressure.

Europe's first underwater restaurant, Under, by Snohetta in Båly, south Norway

“The idea was to make a tube that would bring people from above sea level down under the sea,” Grasdal added.

“That transition is easy to understand, but it’s also the most effective way to do it. It also feels secure, but you don’t feel trapped.”

The concrete has been left with an exposed, rugged texture to encourage algae and molluscs to cling on. Overtime this will create an artificial mussel reef that helps purify the water, and in turn naturally attract more marine life.

Europe's first underwater restaurant, Under, by Snohetta in Båly, south Norway

Under is accessed by untreated oak-clad entrance. Overtime it will fade into grey tones to complement the raw concrete.

The oak continues inside the building, where the interior finishes are intended to contrast with the exterior, creating a warm atmosphere that prevents the feeling of claustrophobia.

Europe's first underwater restaurant, Under, by Snohetta in Båly, south Norway

The restaurant has three levels including an foyer and cloakroom, champagne bar, and main restaurant on the lower floor. They are joined by a giant oak staircase.

The focal point of the restaurant is its panoramic acrylic window, which can be seen from each level within the building. It measures 11 by three metres, spanning the length of the restaurant wall.

A large vertical window also punctures a wall in the champagne bar, extending down to the restaurant to give visitors a view of the sea level, while getting the daylight through.

Europe's first underwater restaurant, Under, by Snohetta in Båly, south Norway

To enable visitors to observe this sea life through the acrylic windows at night, Snøhetta has teamed gentle lighting on the seabed with muted interior lighting.

“The idea was to have a gradient, starting with light colours to deeper colours at the seabed,” senior interior architect Heidi Pettersvold Nygaard explained.

Europe's first underwater restaurant, Under, by Snohetta in Båly, south Norway

In the main dining room, terrazzo flooring is paired with deep blue and green hued acoustic panels inspired by the seabed, seaweed and rough sea.

Meanwhile, the champagne bar above has warmer pink and orange tones to evoke shells and sand higher on the shore.

Furniture throughout Under is also bespoke. Charred oak tables are teamed with angular chairs and ceramics designed by a local artist using sand from the seabed.

Europe's first underwater restaurant, Under, by Snohetta in Båly, south Norway
Photo is by Inger Marie Grini/Bo Bedre Norge

“You could easily think going five metres underneath the water can be claustrophobic, but no one feels that here,” said Grasdel.

“What I think is important is the warm atmosphere. You have this fabric lining, natural materials like oak, good acoustics, and lighting, so all together you have created a nice atmosphere.”

Europe's first underwater restaurant, Under, by Snohetta in Båly, south Norway
Photo is by Inger Marie Grini/Bo Bedre Norge

Through its architecture and menu, Under is to also intended to inform the public about the biodiversity of the sea.

Out of hours, it will double as a lab for marine biologists to study fish behaviour, specifically their reactions to light, whether it is possible to train wild fish with sounds, and also whether fish act differently in different seasons.

Aerial photo of Under, Europe's first underwater restaurant, by Snohetta in Båly, south Norway
Photo is by André Martinsen

Snøhetta is an architecture and design studio founded in 1989 by architects Craig Dykers and Kjetil Trædal Thorsen. It has offices in Oslo, New York City, San Francisco, California, Innsbruck, Austria, Singapore and Stockholm.

While Under is the studio’s foray into underwater architecture, the firm has designed a number of waterside buildings, including the Oslo Opera House, alongside a hotel for the Lofoten archipelago.

Photography is by Ivar Kvaal unless stated.

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Navid Baraty’s Look on New-York City

« Je ne pouvais pas en croire mes yeux la première fois que j’ai vu à quel point un paysage urbain pouvait se refléter le long des murs d’immeubles de verre », révèle Navid Baraty. Ce photographe qui a quitté une carrière d’ingénieur pour poursuivre sa passion, offre des images uniques de paysages et de villes shootées d’en haut. Pout cette série intitulée « Hidden City », l’artiste a photographié « divers reflets de la ville de New-York vus à travers les fenêtres de gratte-ciels. C’était comme si j’avais découvert une sorte de dimension cachée qui attendait depuis longtemps d’être révélée ».

Explorer le monde armé d’un œil avisé tourné vers l’invisible, le photographe est à la recherche constante de nouvelles perspectives et de nouveaux points de vue. « J’ai trouvé fascinant le fait que l’on puisse percevoir une très grande partie du caractère et de la convivialité d’une ville, à partir d’une vue plongeante au-dessus de ses rues ».

 Retrouvez ses travaux sur sa page Instagram : @navidbaraty

 















 

OMA hits back over dance ban at its Rijnstraat 8 office building in The Hague

OMA responds to complaints about Rijnstraat 8 in the Netherlands

The Dutch government’s warning that dance parties might compromise the structural integrity of OMA‘s Rijnstraat 8 building has been dismissed as “an abundance of caution” by the architecture studio.

According to OMA the reported problems at Rijnstraat 8 in The Hague, which was refurbished by the studio in 2017, are due to “planning and cost-saving, not of architecture”.

The Rem Koolhaas-led practice defended its work following a memo sent to government employees working in the building warning them not to hold parties, stack paper or place a second row of chairs around meeting room tables.

Restrictions a precaution says government

A spokesperson for the Rijksvastoedbedrijf (the Central Government Real Estate Agency) told Dezeen that the memo was sent as a precaution.

Rijnstraat 8 is having it’s BubbleDeck slab flooring surveyed after a carpark under construction at Eindhoven airport that used the same prefabricated system collapsed in 2017. All buildings in the Netherlands with this flooring design are being examined in this way.

Dance ban at OMA's Rijnstraat 8 building 
Government employees have been told not to hold dance parties in the Rijnstraat 8 building

“An investigation of the Rijksvastoedbedrijf regarding Rijnstraat 8 has shown that the building is safe for use, given ample safety margins and certain safety measures,” Simone Klein Haneveld, spokesperson for the Rijksvastoedbedrijf, told Dezeen.

“These measures are not new but have been in place for a while, and have been taken as a precaution because safety is our priority.”

“Neoliberal economic policies” at fault says OMA

Since its refurbishment in 2017 there have been a number issues at Rijnstraat, with employees complaining of a lack of privacy and “depressing” interiors, reports the BBC.

Jeremy Higginbotham, director of public affairs at OMA, told Dezeen that it was the Dutch government’s introduction of a hot-desking system that had led to problems in the building’s operation.

Dance ban at OMA's Rijnstraat 8 building 
Employees at Rijnstraat 8 have complained about a lack of privacy and “depressing” interiors

Up to 6,000 civil servants have to share only 3,000 desks now that three government departments share space in Rijnstraat 8  in what OMA called a “hardcore cost-saving move”.

“We have this issue because of neoliberal economic policies in which cost savings are prioritised above all else,” continued Higginbotham.

“We warned against these issues in the design process but to no avail: ‘flex-working’ and ‘hot-desking’ have become dogma.”

Interior decoration a “matter of taste”

Overcrowding in Rijnstraat 8 has caused minor issues with the €267 million (£228 million) renovation to become overblown OMA claimed. The project, which won the ARC17 Architecture Award for sustainability, was overseen by the architect Ellen van Loon.

Van Loon designed black and white interiors punctuated by black metal staircases and neon yellow escalators for Rijnstraat 8, with statement spaces such as congress facility designed to look like the War Room in Stanley Kubrick’s Dr Strangelove.

OMA claims the problems at the building are due to the government’s hot-desking policy

“Because of the larger problems with the government’s hot-desking policy, a few isolated complaints about the building have been amplified to look like systemic problems, which they are not,” said Higginbotham.

“Workspaces are flooded with daylight and our colour scheme is based on that of the original architect Jan Hoogstad, which included black cores. Use of this colour is a matter of taste, and in agreement with the users, we have already changed the lift lobbies to a light colour.”

The architecture studio said that the contractor was working to rectify construction issues with the stairs.

Office for Metropolitan Architecture, better known as OMA, was founded by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Koolhaas, with Elia Zenghelis, Madelon Vriesendorp and Zoe Zenghelis in 1975.

The studio is responsible for numerous buildings around the world including the Casa da Música in Porto, China Central Television Headquarters in Beijing, and the Qatar National Library in Doha. Its long awaited Taipei Performing Arts Center is nearing completion in Taiwan.

Photography is by Delfino Sisto Legnani and Marco Cappelletti.

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Careers guide: Gavin Green reveals his path to designing theatres on Broadway

Gavin Green is responsible for design at theatre consultancy Charcoalblue. He explains how he came to work on major renovations of theatres across the globe, in this interview for the Dezeen Jobs careers guide.

Green applied for a job in theatre consultancy after finishing his architecture degree, despite not having a theatrical background. He soon found himself working with Michael Wilford on the Lowry in Salford and Behnisch and Behnisch Partners on the failed Harbourside Centre in Bristol, and “was hooked”.

It was working under renowned lighting designer Richard Pilbrow on London’s National Theatre that Green met the future co-founders of Charcoalblue, and the company has since worked on the major overhaul of London’s Royal Opera House and the Stirling Prize-winning Liverpool Everyman.

He says his career highlight was working on St Anne’s Warehouse in Brooklyn, “a highly unconventional theatre built inside an old Civil War era warehouse which has the most beautiful brick walls sandwiched between Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges, looking across the East River.”

Green’s team consists of architects, engineers, lighting and sound designers, and set designers. “We seek out people with a passion for performance,” he said. “We ask about the shows they’ve seen in interviews as a test, to get them to describe how the production sat in the theatre.”

“We also give our staff two free theatre tickets a month to ensure they stay engaged and energised by performance and the latest technologies – and to get them away from their desk!”

Green’s number one tip to those that want to go into spatial design for live performance is to “go to the theatre lots! And to concerts, and dance, and immersive work.”

He also reinforces the importance of remaining positive.

“Architecture and construction are hard work at times, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the process,” he added.

Read the interview on Dezeen Jobs ›

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