VL92 Gin & Tonic Emergency Kit: A vibrant Dutch tipple conveniently and handsomely packaged

VL92 Gin & Tonic Emergency Kit


More than just curious paper packaging (though it is lovely, thanks to design agency Rare Fruits Council), VL92’s Gin & Tonic Emergency Kit is a smart option for the…

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To Improve In-Car Visibility, a Better Solution than Rearview Mirrors and Monitors: Just Make the Back of the Car Invisible

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This is a fascinating idea that was developed by a research group at Japan’s Keio University. By applying optical camouflage technology and using recursive reflectors, which “[reflect] light back in the direction of incidence,” the researchers were essentially able to render the back of a Toyota Prius invisible, at least from the driver’s point of view. Take a look:

What we found fascinating is their proposal that this could be applied to all 360 degrees. And aside from average motorists trying to back passenger cars into parking spaces, imagine what a boon this would be to folks driving delivery trucks, tractor-trailers, construction machinery and other bulky, blind-spot-laden vehicles.

Unfortunately, the technology may never come to pass. The concept was put forth in 2011, and there’s been no word on an update since the video above was released in 2012. But tell me this thing wouldn’t get Kickstarted in a heartbeat.

Via DigInfo TV

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INST-INT 2014: Conference Highlights: From the founders of Eyeo, this specialized forum focuses the spotlight on interactive art and technology

INST-INT 2014: Conference Highlights


From the founders of technology festival Eyeo comes a smaller, more tightly focused offshoot called INST-INT. Now in its second year, the stimulating three-day experience saw roughly 300 people…

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Miniature Paintings Project

« Postcards for Ants » est un projet d’illustrations miniatures mené par Lorraine Loot, tout au long de l’année. Chaque jour de l’année 2013 depuis le 1er Janvier, cette artiste, basée à Cape Town, a réalisé un petit dessin très détaillé avec de la peinture et des crayons. Une longue oeuvre pleine de délicatesse marquant chaque jour d’une image et d’une carte postale.

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House in a car park by Alts Design Office hides a covered passage behind its walls

A secluded passage extends along one edge of this house in Japan by Alts Design Office, bringing natural light into the interior (+ slideshow).

Kusatsu House by Alts Design Office

Japanese studio Alts Design Office, whose previous projects include a house filled with pointed doorways and openings, designed the two-storey Kusatsu House for a site beside a car park in Shiga.



The close proximity of neighbouring residences and apartment blocks made it impractical to add glazing on the south-facing facades, so architects Sumiou Mizumoto and Yoshitaka Kuga instead created an open-air passageway along the north-western wall.

Kusatsu House by Alts Design Office

“A house with southern exposure is not good because the client wants to secure the privacy,” explained the architects.

Kusatsu House by Alts Design Office

“Therefore, we arranged the exclusive path inside of the house. We gave importance to designing an outside space in the inside space, and produced a diverse and interesting space,” they said.

Kusatsu House by Alts Design Office

Flanked by a windowless concrete wall, the passageway is glazed at both ends and has a skylight overhead, allowing daylight to permeate the building throughout the day.

Kusatsu House by Alts Design Office

A traditional Japanese tatami area is located within the space, alongside a small rock garden. Glazed doors open the passage to the open-plan living room, dining area and kitchen, which takes up most of the ground floor.

Kusatsu House by Alts Design Office

“We didn’t separate into inside and outside of house simply,” said Mizumoto and Kuga. “By doing so, we brought a feeling of strangeness in a good sense.”

Kusatsu House by Alts Design Office

The room features simple furnishings that define the different areas. A wooden dining table offers seating for four people, while a selection of plants sit beside the walls and a low white wall defines the kitchen.

Kusatsu House by Alts Design Office

Wooden panel flooring runs throughout the interior. Chunky timber surrounds doors and windows, while a steel-framed staircase leads up to the first floor.

Kusatsu House by Alts Design Office

This upper storey is divided up into four rooms. The largest is the master bedroom, which leads out to a balcony positioned above the passageway.

Kusatsu House by Alts Design Office

Two smaller rooms accommodate the family’s children, while the fourth space is a bathroom, with a separate WC alongside.

Kusatsu House by Alts Design Office

Photography is by Yuta Yamada.

Kusatsu House by Alts Design Office

Site plan – click for larger image

Kusatsu House by Alts Design Office

Ground floor plan – click for larger image

Kusatsu House by Alts Design Office

First floor plan – click for larger image

Kusatsu House by Alts Design Office

Section – click for larger image

Kusatsu House by Alts Design Office

Elevation – click for larger image

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hides a covered passage behind its walls
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Illustrator Donald Robertson on Great Jones Street: The Instagram-famous illustrator opens up his work to interact with passersby

Illustrator Donald Robertson on Great Jones Street


In recent years illustrator Donald Robertson has made a name for himself with technicolor drawings of toothy lipstick smiles, cartoonish animals and fashion industry icons like Anna Wintour and Karl…

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Frosted glass and dark marble walls partition Sendagrup Medical Centre by Pauzarq

This medical centre in San Sebastian, designed by Spanish studio Pauzarq, has consultation rooms with translucent glass walls (+ slideshow).

Sendagrup Medical Centre by Pauzarq

The Sendagrup Medical Centre occupies the 556-square-metre ground floor of a building in the Zuatzu business park in northern Spain.



Sendagrup Medical Centre by Pauzarq

“Originally the place was completely empty and Sendagrup Medical Centre asked us for a bright and spacious place where patients can be oriented easily. We have looked for a timeless character, elegant but not going out of fashion,” Pauzarq co-founder Elena Usabiaga told Dezeen.

Sendagrup Medical Centre by Pauzarq

Pauzarq designed the clinic around a central block containing toilets, a meeting room, a kitchen, two changing rooms, an X-ray room, a store and a room dedicated to plaster treatment. This service island is flanked on either side by a row of consultation rooms clad in contrasting materials.

Sendagrup Medical Centre by Pauzarq

The middle area and a set of consultation rooms that run along the south-eastern side of the building are constructed from a fir timber frame in-filled with a double layer of glass.

Sendagrup Medical Centre by Pauzarq

The architects used U-glass – a type of glass known for its structural strength, light diffusion and sound insulation properties – to ensure privacy for the clinic’s patients.

Sendagrup Medical Centre by Pauzarq

“The poles or vertical wooden elements have a dual function,” said Usabiaga. “First they give stability to the pieces of glass and on the other side they are used to hold the wooden panels inside. Also they serve to mark an interesting vertical rhythm.”

Sendagrup Medical Centre by Pauzarq

The translucent glass allows light to pass from these rooms into the corridors around the central area.

Sendagrup Medical Centre by Pauzarq

The six glass rooms are arranged in pairs, each sharing an adjoining wall. Sections of maple panelling along these walls surround examination tables to create an opaque partition.

Sendagrup Medical Centre by Pauzarq

“This generates an interesting play of transparencies and opacities from the corridors similar to typical folding screens,” Usabiaga said. “The materials generate different textures and reflections and contrast between the coldness of glass and marble and the warmth of wood.”

Sendagrup Medical Centre by Pauzarq

Along the north-western facade, five more consultation rooms are constructed from locally sourced black marble flecked with grey veins. The “heavy and dark” material offers a stark contrast to the light-filled rooms opposite.

Sendagrup Medical Centre by Pauzarq

Pale wooden doors punctuate the black facade to pick up on the fir framework that makes up the rest of the space.

Sendagrup Medical Centre by Pauzarq

All of the rooms open out directly onto a circulation area, which flows around the central island to “create a sense of spaciousness” and to help patients navigate the space.

Sendagrup Medical Centre by Pauzarq

Waiting areas located between the glass rooms cluster below Perspex signage with black letters that stand out against the neutral toned backdrop, while signs on the marble rooms are lit by individual wall-mounted lamps.

Sendagrup Medical Centre by Pauzarq

Exploded axonometric diagram – click for larger image

Sendagrup Medical Centre by Pauzarq

Floor plan – click for larger image

The post Frosted glass and dark marble walls partition
Sendagrup Medical Centre by Pauzarq
appeared first on Dezeen.

The Distance Between Two Points

Art in the Age has a show of Scotty Albrecht‘s work opening later this week in Philadelphia.

“In The Distance Between Two Points, Albrecht explores themes of time, perception and interconnectivity. The artist took a holistic approach toward this exhibition, inspired by the concept that consciousness is informed by multiple factors, shaped by personal histories and past experiences. His goal was to create a body of work with layers of meaning, each piece functions individually yet many convey a larger message collectively, in relation to the others.”

Vienna Design Week 2014: Passionswege — BCXSY x Lobmeyr

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‘Design Week’ season is very much upon us here in Europe. As things wrap in London, we’ve jetted over to the slightly more sedate and astonishingly grandiose (seriously, Paris ain’t got nothing) Vienna—capital of Austria—to hit the trail of Vienna Design Week, running from September 26 to October 5.

We’re delighted to see the return of the awesome ‘Passionswege’ platform—the program in which the city’s design department pair traditional manufacturing companies still surviving in the region with emerging international design talent, the partnerships sharing skills and often creating some truly inspiring objects and interventions.

First stop in Vienna this year, world -eknowned crystal manufacturer Lobmeyr—who took part in the Passionswege last year— invited the public to their showroom and workshop to see the fruits of their pairing with design duo BCXSY.

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Glitch Photography

Voici un panorama de photographies signé Sabato Visconti : on y perçoit des portraits et des mise en scène brouillées à certains endroits ou sur toute la surface. Pour obtenir ces anomalies, l’artiste utilise des applications informatiques et manipule les codages pour dissocier les pixels. À découvrir en images.

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